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Monday January 31, 2011

83

BEST PICTURE
* 127 Hours - Danny Boyle and Christian Colson
* Black Swan - Scott Franklin, Mike Medavoy, and Brian Oliver
* The Fighter - David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman, and Mark Wahlberg
* Inception - Christopher Nolan and Emma Thomas
* The Kids Are All Right - Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte, and Celine Rattray
* The King's Speech - Iain Canning, Emile Sherman, and Gareth Unwin
* The Social Network - Dana Brunetti, Ceán Chaffin, Michael De Luca, and Scott Rudin
* Toy Story 3 - Darla K. Anderson
* True Grit - Ethan Coen and Joel Coen
* Winter's Bone - Alix Madigan and Anne Rosellini

BEST DIRECTOR
* Darren Aronofsky - Black Swan
* Ethan Coen and Joel Coen - True Grit
* David Fincher - The Social Network
* Tom Hooper - The King's Speech
* David O. Russell - The Fighter

BEST ACTOR
* Javier Bardem - Biutiful as Uxbal
* Jeff Bridges - True Grit as Rooster Cogburn
* Jesse Eisenberg - The Social Network as Mark Zuckerberg
* Colin Firth - The King's Speech as Prince Albert / King George VI
* James Franco - 127 Hours as Aron Ralston

BEST ACTRESS
* Annette Bening - The Kids Are All Right as Nic
* Nicole Kidman - Rabbit Hole as Becca Corbett
* Jennifer Lawrence - Winter's Bone as Ree Dolly
* Natalie Portman - Black Swan as Nina Sayers
* Michelle Williams - Blue Valentine as Cindy

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
* Christian Bale - The Fighter as Dicky Eklund
* John Hawkes - Winter's Bone as Teardrop
* Jeremy Renner - The Town as James "Gem" Coughlin
* Mark Ruffalo - The Kids Are All Right as Paul
* Geoffrey Rush - The King's Speech as Lionel Logue

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
* Amy Adams - The Fighter as Charlene Fleming
* Helena Bonham Carter - The King's Speech as Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon / Queen Elizabeth
* Melissa Leo - The Fighter as Alice Ward
* Hailee Steinfeld - True Grit as Mattie Ross
* Jacki Weaver - Animal Kingdom as Janine "Smurf" Cody

BEST WRITING - ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
* Another Year - Mike Leigh
* The Fighter - Scott Silver, Paul Tamasy, and Eric Johnson
* Inception - Christopher Nolan
* The Kids Are All Right - Lisa Cholodenko and Stuart Blumberg
* The King's Speech - David Seidler

BEST WRITING - ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
* 127 Hours - Danny Boyle and Simon Beaufoy from Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
* The Social Network - Aaron Sorkin from The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich
* Toy Story 3 - Michael Arndt, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, and Lee Unkrich; characters based on Toy Story and Toy Story 2
* True Grit - Ethan Coen and Joel Coen from True Grit by Charles Portis
* Winter's Bone - Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini from Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
* How to Train Your Dragon - Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois
* The Illusionist - Sylvain Chomet
* Toy Story 3 - Lee Unkrich

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
* Biutiful (Mexico) in Spanish and English - Alejandro González Iñárritu
* Dogtooth (Greece) in Greek - Yorgos Lanthimos
* In a Better World (Denmark) in Danish, Swedish, and English - Susanne Bier
* Incendies (Canada) in French and Arabic - Denis Villeneuve
* Outside the Law (Algeria) in Arabic and French - Rachid Bouchareb

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
* Exit Through the Gift Shop - Banksy and Jaimie D'Cruz
* Gasland - Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic
* Inside Job - Charles H. Ferguson and Audrey Marrs
* Restrepo - Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger
* Waste Land - Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley

BEST DOCUMENTARY - SHORT SUBJECT
* Killing in the Name - Jed Rothstein
* Poster Girl– Sara Nesson
* Strangers No More - Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon
* Sun Come Up - Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger
* The Warriors of Qiugang - Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
* The Confession - Tanel Toom
* The Crush - Michael Creagh
* God of Love - Luke Matheny
* Well Wewe - Ivan Goldschmidt
* Wish 143 - Ian Barnes

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
* Day & Night - Teddy Newton
* The Gruffalo - Max Lang and Jakob Schuh
* Let's Pollute - Geefwee Boedoe
* The Lost Thing - Andrew Ruhemann and Shaun Tan
* Madagascar, a Journey Diary - Bastien Dubois

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
* 127 Hours - A.R. Rahman
* How to Train Your Dragon - John Powell
* Inception - Hans Zimmer
* The King's Speech - Alexandre Desplat
* The Social Network - Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
* "Coming Home" from Country Strong - Bob DiPiero, Tom Douglas, Hillary Lindsey, and Troy Verges
* "I See the Light" from Tangled - Alan Menken and Glenn Slater
* "If I Rise" from 127 Hours - A.R. Rahman, Rollo Armstrong, and Dido
* "We Belong Together" from Toy Story 3 - Randy Newman

BEST SOUND EDITING
* Inception - Richard King
* Toy Story 3 - Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
* Tron: Legacy - Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
* True Grit - Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
* Unstoppable - Mark P. Stoeckinger

BEST SOUND MIXING
* Inception - Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo, and Ed Novick
* The King's Speech - Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen, and John Midgley
* Salt - Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan, and William Sarokin
* The Social Network - Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick, and Mark Weingarten
* True Grit - Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff, and Peter F. Kurland

BEST ART DIRECTION
* Alice in Wonderland - Art Direction: Robert Stromberg; Set Decoration: Karen O'Hara
* Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 - Art Direction: Stuart Craig; Set Decoration: Stephenie McMillan
* Inception - Art Direction: Guy Hendrix Dyas; Set Decoration: Larry Dias and Doug Mowat
* The King's Speech - Art Direction: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Judy Farr
* True Grit - Art Direction: Jess Gonchor; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
* Black Swan - Matthew Libatique
* Inception - Wally Pfister
* The King's Speech - Danny Cohen
* The Social Network - Jeff Cronenweth
* True Grit - Roger Deakins

BEST MAKEUP
* Barney's version - Adrien Morot
* The Way Back - Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk, and Yolanda Toussieng
* The Wolfman - Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
* Alice in Wonderland - Colleen Atwood
* I Am Love - Antonella Cannarozzi
* The King's Speech - Jenny Beavan
* The Tempest - Sandy Powell
* True Grit - Mary Zophres

BEST FILM EDITING
* 127 Hours - Jon Harris
* Black Swan - Andrew Weisblum
* The Fighter - Pamela Martin
* The King's Speech - Tariq Anwar
* The Social Network - Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
* Alice in Wonderland - Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas, and Sean Phillips
* Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 - Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz, and Nicolas Aithadi
* Hereafter - Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojanski, and Joe Farrell
* Inception - Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley, and Peter Bebb
* Iron Man 2 - Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright, and Daniel Sudick

Friday January 28, 2011

In the nude.

"Yes, we have a dress code. You have to dress."

- Scott McNealy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems; stolen from my colleague Gregor.

Wednesday January 26, 2011

On the job

"Obviously, I do know that QA, at least a tester, is at the bottom of the totem pole."

- Will "Cyrus" Powers, Winner of the Reality Show "The Tester"

Friday January 21, 2011

Franz Kafka...

... can be staged.

Kammerspiele, Franz Kafka: The trial. Director: Andreas Kriegenburg, with Walter Hess, Sylvana Krappatsch, Lena Lauzemis, Oliver Mallison, Bernd Moss, Annette Paulmann, Katharina Marie Schubert, Edmund Telgenkämper. Stage: Andreas Kriegenburg, costumes: Andrea Schraad, lighting: Björn Gerum, dramaturgy: Matthias Günther, photo: Arno Declair. On January 20th, 2011, with André.

From Russia with Love (1963)

In the following year, 1963, the second Bond appears, again by director Terence Young and with Sean Connery as Bond. It is the last Bond Ian Fleming himself sees, who dies of heart failure in 1964. 'From Russia with Love' is considered by many to be the best bond of all time.
At the beginning, Bond can be seen again with Sylvia Trench, quasi the first Bond girl; the running gag of presenting her as a kind of long-term friend of Bonds, which he has to abruptly leave repeatedly for each important mission, ends with this film. Before that, he is supposedly murdered - in a training session in a labyrinthine hedge garden near a villa, a SPECTER training course that introduces us to the tough guy, Red Grant. Shocker! But it was just a strange man with a bond mask, and the opening sequence follows. Then even more villains: The Czechoslovak chess master in Venice turns out to be No. 5 of SPECTER, he has designed a plot that is supposed to bring Bond down and at the same time the Russian deciphering machine Lektor in their possession. Our house-and-yard spy is already the No. 1 target of the nasty secret organization, so much for the secrecy aspect of agents. No. 3 of SPECTER is the former Russian secret service agent Rosa Klebb, our main antagonist of the film, a shaky character. And for the first time we meet No. 1 - Ernst Stavro Blofeld, in the credits with '?' provided, since we only see his voice and white cat on his lap. Actually a contender for the "Grandiose Introduction of a Character (Movie)" list. No. 3 selects her people, inspects Grant and pretends to our Bond girl Tatiana Romanova that she would do Mother Russia and the KGB a service and should seduce James Bond and get him the lecturer.
Now Bond, Flirt, Miss Monneypenny and - finally - Q and the first gadgets: a case with coins, a knife, a craft rifle plus ammunition and a tear gas ignition thing. So off to Istanbul in Turkey: Romanova fell in love with a Foto Bonds, would only overflow him personally, together with a lecturer. The ally Ali Kerim Bey, together with his innumerable sons, will help. He's about to be bombed, whereupon Bond and Bey spy underground on the Russians via periscope and notice a nasty Bulgarian killer. To gain a bit of time out, the two go to a gypsy festival, with belly dancing and two women fighting each other, which of course end up with Bond, not without the gypsy camp being attacked by the killer beforehand. Back in Istanbul, they shoot him trying to abseil out of a house-painted woman's mouth window.
It follows a night of love with Romanova, which is filmed by Klebb and Grant, and a bit of local color and murder in the Haggia Sophia. The Lektor is freed from the consulate with a nice explosion and Romanova, Bey and Bond flee to the Orient Express, Grant on their heels. He kills Bey, a Russian spy, and later pretends to be an allied British secret agent. Bond finds out about him, big scramble, at the end Grant opens the gadget case and gets the full roar of tear gas. The escape from the Orient Express includes a helicopter and a motorboat hunt initiated by Klebb. She now has one last chance to hunt down Bond - No. 5 was murdered before her very eyes because of the defeat, by means of a poisonous spur in his shoe. We learn: even the enemy has gadgets. Motorboat hunting becomes nothing, Bond and Romanova reach Venice. Here Klepp lies in wait for them as a maid, but the spur-in-shoe doesn't work, Romanova shoots her. Closing frame again Bond, Bond girl, boat, water, announcement of the next Bond film: Goldfinger.

Bond factor: Hard to catch up, iconic, and everything you need in a classic line-up. In addition to Sean Connery, Miss Moneypenny (14x Lois Maxwell) and 'M' (11x Bernard Lee) now also 'Q' (17x Desmond Llewelyn). No Martini, I think, no "Bond, James Bond", but Blofeld with the white cat, several locations, Bond-Biters, Teasers and the Russians, albeit spaceless. If the phone counts, then there is a car with extras here, but above all the gadget case and the enemy's gadget shoes, chic. The Bond girl, Daniela Bianchi, I found, however, rather pale and a bit stupid and stupid-loyal to dear Bond, questionable and undoubtedly, ugh. The music is here for the first time by John Barry, who still has components from Dr. No picks up on it, but has shaped Bond musically in a total of eleven films.
Big remembered scenes (already seen as a child): The train scene with the "exploding" suitcase has been milled in, also the chess scene at the beginning with number 5. But then again big holes: I hardly remember the gypsy scenes, not even the one Steal the editor or the helicopter scene.
Trivia: The film is covered with a large amount of tragedy and accidents; Pedro Amendáriz, the actor in Bey, took his own life towards the end of the shooting - he was already in great pain during the shooting because he was terminally ill with cancer. The film had to be partially restructured and exceeded budget (2 million) and schedule. Around the helicopter scenes there were accidents or almost accidents that involved Connery and Terence Young. This plot was chosen because John F. Kennedy listed it as one of his favorite books - the film was the last he saw before he was murdered. Ian Fleming also died without having seen the next Bond at the age of fifty-six. The scene in which Romanova is waiting for him in Bond's bed is the classic screen test for new Bonds, sometimes also Bond girls - it can be found in recordings by James Brolin, Sean Bean, Sam Neill and Pierce Brosnan. The tough guy, Gant, looks grim and threatening for a long time before speaking for the first time after 80 minutes. The Hitchcock reference is taken up again with the helicopter scene - also a homage to North by Northwest. Hitchcock was temporarily considered as a director, and Cary Grant and Grace Kelly as Bond and Romanova, but this was dropped because of the commercial failure of Vertigo. Bond wears eight bespoke Saville Row suits in the film, each of which cost about $ 2,000. The Romanova, like Honey Ryder, is dubbed - the Russian accent of the Italian Miss Universe Daniela Bianchi was not very convincing.

"Red wine with fish ... Well, that should have told me something." "

From Russia with Love (1963), January 15, 2011, with the treasure, in German, parts in English. 7/10

Thursday January 20, 2011

Films January 2011

Dr. No (1962)
Part of the annual project, see here for details. 7/10

Fame (2009)
Remake of a 1980 film of the same name that takes a handful of students at a New York dance and performing arts high school from admission to graduation. Nice, beautiful scenes, musical-like song sequences and very active stories and good music. 5/10

From Russia with Love (1963)
Part of the annual project, see here for details. 7/10

You will meet a tall dark stranger (2010)
New Woody Allen with a beautiful cast: Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin, Anthony Hopkins, Gemma Jones, Freida Pinto, and Naomi Watts. Watts works for Banderas, for whom she also has a weakness, but who starts an affair with a friend of hers and leaves his wife for her. Watts himself is also married anyway, to Brolin, who is watching Pinto in the apartment across the street and is dating her; Watts divorces Brolin, Pinto leaves her fiancé and lets their wedding break, but their new relationship is not so bright. Watts mother Jones takes legal advice after being abandoned by her husband Hopkins, who marries a prostitute who cheats on him; in the end he wants his wife back. She doesn't, she didn't get to know the "tall, dark stranger" but an antiquarian who shares her new spiritual interest. Overall nice, good actors, funny scenes, but the film somehow lacks the big round. January 19, 2010, Museum Lichtspiele, with André. 7/10

Push (2009)
Totally passed me by, so to speak, a comic film adaptation that I now somehow came across. A bit of X-Men for the MTV generation (or for the poor), with groups instead of individual skills, and a setting in Japan that harshly touches the limit of being taken seriously. Nevertheless, I liked it very much, entertaining, and I just like the genre. Cute Chris Evans and grown up Dakota Fanning, who, I'm afraid, is not a good actress. 5/10

Doubt (2008)
John Patrick Shanley filmed his Pulitzer Prize-winning play here, which was also nominated for five Oscars (the actors and the script) but unfortunately didn't win any.Seldom seen a film with such a grand cast that focuses 90% on the characters anyway: Meryl Streep plays the head of a small monastery that is attached to a school, Philipp Seymour Hoffman the priest of the community. When she suspects him of developing a misguided relationship with one of the students, she confuses one of her sisters (Amy Adams) and the boy's mother (Viola Davis) and eventually drives Hoffman out of the ward; he submits his resignation, but is ultimately promoted. The joke is that it never comes out whether the suspicions that Meryl Streep has are justified - the title here is the concept of how this could be translated in German as a 'question of faith' must remain incomprehensible. Cinematography by the highly admired Roger Deakins, the whole thing very chunky; impressively told story that resonates. 9/10

Black Swan (2010)

Ha, hahahahah. The same applies to what I wrote about the wrestler: "Aronofsky may be a genius, but I don't understand him." Otherwise one can only say: very, very great Natalie Portman in the film, also Mila Kunis and Barbara Hershey wonderful and - ah - Vincent Kassel, of course, good. Over-the-top film about the stumbling of a ballerina who is supposed to dance the swan lake, but only really controls the white swan, while the black swan repeatedly eludes her. Over-the-top camera work, creepy whole. Well, kind of, but Aronofsky and I, I don't think we will get together anymore in this life. 01/26/2010, City, with Medi, André, Felix. 8/10

The Funny World of Animals (1974)
Reunion with many of the animals seen in Tanzania, I also knew some of the stories from my vacation, and I still have the Amarula schnapps at home. Funny one-man documentary staged by the South African author and director Jamie Uys, who was later responsible for 'The Gods Must Be Crazy'. Film evening at work, with Christian, Alex, Roland, Werner, Robert, Rolf and Richard. 6/10

Morning Glory (2010)
Possibly the first movie I like Rachel McAdams in, all other characters starred: Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Patrick Wilson and Jeff Goldblum. The film is quite typical of the genre - an energetic young professional is placed in a challenging position, but ultimately prevails, due to her good heart, will, optimism and the belief in the grumpy leading actor of older caliber, and also finds a new love. The whole thing in the breakfast television setting results in a less bad film than was initially accepted, in fact I found it basically refreshing and cheerful. 6/10

Monday 17th January 2011

Dr. No (1962)

The first Bond is from 1962, by director Terence Young, who will also direct two of the next Bonds, 'From Russia with Love' (1963) and 'Thunderball' (1965). Not the first volume in Fleming's series will be the first film in Dr. No, Bond is already established as 007 at MI6; the advantage for the film was that the plot managed with one location and a larger set. The mission takes him to Jamaica, but of course the film doesn't start without first accommodating an Armoureuse in the character of Miss "Trench, Sylvia Trench" and letting Bond flirt with Miss Moneypenney. In Jamaica he is supposed to track down the British secret agent John Strangways, who has disappeared (we already know: murdered). It is determined in beautiful Connery charm; Bond meets CIA comrade Felix Leiter, the boatswain Quarrel, the mysterious island of 'Crab Key', the traitorous Professor Dent and Miss Taro. With Quarrel, after all the research, it goes on to 'Crab Key', on which the famous scene takes place in which Ursula Andress aka Honey Ryder in a bikini rises out of the water and sings 'Underneath the Mango Tree'. Iconic. All three flee from Dr. No's men, but Quarrel is ultimately burned by a dragon vehicle and Honey and Bond are captured. One meets Dr. No, a member of SPECTER (Special Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge, and Extortion) - a secret organization that you will meet again in many other Bond films and which is sometimes called PHANTOM in German. Dr. No is slightly insane and has black plastic hands, an aquarium and a nuclear power plant that he uses to feed radio beams that are supposed to disrupt space shuttles in Cape Canaveral. Bond is disturbing the disturbance, Dr. No dies and the nuclear power plant goes up, but of course not before he can flee in a boat with Honey - the boat with Bond and Honey on a lonely sea forms the final picture. Bond factor: The first film already has a lot of what will later become iconic for Bond: Sean Connery, Miss Moneypenny (14x Lois Maxwell), 'M' (11x Bernard Lee), the gun barrel opening sequence, the James -Bond theme, the double zero with the license to kill and for this the Walther PPK, the shaken-not-stirred Martini, the "Bond-Girls", the megalomaniac antagonist with megalomaniac base, the "Bond, James Bond" phrase and that End of the film: Bond with Bond girl in a boat on a lonely lake. What is missing is 'Q' - there is only a virtually nameless and faceless Armorer, Major Boothroyd, who is already Q, but not really, and the gadgets are still missing, there is no teaser before or with the title sequence and No antagonist for the rough yet (like Beißer), but otherwise the Bondic recognition value is already very high. Big remembered scenes (already seen as a child): The sealing of the door with spit and a hair, as well as Honey's answer to her schooling: By encyclopedia, she had now reached the letter 'S'. The latter has become so burned into me as a child that it must explain my great enthusiasm for lists and their orderly work through. Trivia: What was new to me was that the "Bond, James Bond" catchphrase is actually the first thing Sean Connery speaks in the film. I didn't really remember Specter either, staged here for the only time without Blofeld. The actress, Miss Moneypenny, an archetype of the British, is Canadian. The picture of Dr. No's, in front of which Bond pisses, is an actual Goya, stolen in 1961, showing the Duke of Wellington, and only found again in 1965. The film was inspired by Hitchcock's' North by Northwest '- what you see, I think, the set designer is from Bond for' Dr. Strangelove or how I learned to love the bomb 'hiked on. The film was shot on a budget of less than 1 million, and up to 'Quantum of Solace' (2008), along with Goldfinger, was the shortest Bond with 111 minutes running time. "I admire your courage, Miss ...?" - "Trench. Sylvia Trench. I admire your luck, Mr. ...?" - "Bond. James Bond."Dr. No (1962), 04.01.2010, with André, in English. 7/10

Friday January 14th 2011

Theme teams

Because I've been talking about it for so long and over and over again, now in writing before I even implement it, lists for chic kicker-themed team ideas:

Goal: Alexander Stephan (Nuremberg), defense: Manuel Friedrich (Leverkusen), Arne Friedrich (Wolfsburg), Clemens Fritz (Werder), Mathias Abel (Kaiserslautern), midfield: Sidney Sam (Leverkusen), Christian Clemens (Cologne), Maik Franz (Frankfurt), Markus Karl (Ingolstadt), storm: Luca Toni (Juventus Turin), Tobias Werner (Augsburg), coach: Wolfgang Frank.

Goal: René Adler (Leverkusen), defense: Mats Hummels (Dortmund), Patrick Ochs (Frankfurt), Christian Fuchs (Mainz), Andreas Wolf (Nuremberg), midfield: Aaron Hunt (Werder), Leonhard Haas (Fürth), Gaetan Krebs (Karlsruhe), storm: Arjen Robben (FCB), Anton Fink (Karlsruhe), Robert Strauss (Aue), coach: Christian Ziege

Thursday January 13, 2011

Cod fishing from the boat and on the coast

... can now be tracked very precisely. The Norwegian receiver Norais records the positions of 60,000 ships on the world's oceans - in the past there was often the horizon between the automatic identification system of the ships and the receiver, today it is installed on the ISS space station, from where, as expected, it has a very good overview , look here:

Sunday 9th January 2011

What did that look like in the script?

(Oh, and how happy I am that the JMStV in its planned new version did not come into force - where would my blog be classified according to this post ...?)