How old is Jayceon Taylor's daughter

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was born on August 15, 1875 in Holborn, central London. The first musically significant event in his life occurred when, at the age of about five, he was given a quarter-size violin by the person believed to be his maternal grandfather. The element of doubt arises from the fact that the precise identity of the child’s mother was intentionally obscured by the family because she and the father, Dr Daniel Hughes Taylor, were not married. Indeed, Dr Taylor had returned to his home country of Sierra Leone probably even before his son was born. Young Samuel’s mother subsequently married railway worker George Evans and the family moved to Croydon. Especially given the attitudes and prejudices that prevailed in 1880, the fact that George Evans took on an unmarried mother with a mixed-race child says much about the man.

It turned out that the little boy had a startling natural aptitude for the violin. Having been taken under the wing of local violinist Joseph Beckwith and later supported by Colonel Herbert Walters, Coleridge-Taylor’s talent developed rapidly and remarkably. Walters sponsored his entry to the Royal College of Music in 1890 as a violin student of Henry Holmes. But his abilities were not restricted to playing the violin: his interest in composition was developing and in 1891 he wrote an anthem, In thee, O Lord, which was immediately published by Novello. At the suggestion of Walters, it was arranged that Coleridge-Taylor would study composition seriously under Charles Villiers Stanford; he quickly won the first in a succession of composition scholarships.

Coleridge-Taylor possessed both prodigious talent and refined musical taste; it is worth observing that Stanford regarded him as one of his two most brilliant students, the other being Coleridge-Taylor's friend William Yeates Hurlstone, who died at the age of thirty in 1906. Talented though Hurlstone undoubtedly was, Coleridge-Taylor's gifts — especially his flair for melody — were of a higher order altogether. Stanford’s assessment of Coleridge-Taylor’s abilities represents no mean accolade when one considers that he also taught, among many others, Arthur Bliss, Frank Bridge, Gustav Holst, Herbert Howells, John Ireland, E J Moeran and Ralph Vaughan Williams. One rather touching illustration of Stanford’s regard for his favorite protégé is his contribution to Coleridge-Taylor’s college report at the end of the Easter term of 1895, in which he wrote under the column headings respectively: Regularity and Punctuality — ‘Invariable ’; Industry — Indefatigable ’; and Progress — ‘Indisputable ’!

From 1896 the awakening of Coleridge-Taylor to his African heritage made an increasing impact on his music: he had been deeply moved by the spirituals of the African-American ‘Fisk Jubilee Singers’ who had recently toured England. At about the same time he met the African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar and settings of some of Dunbar’s poetry were his earliest compositions to be inspired by his race. Notwithstanding the duality of his racial heritage, Coleridge-Taylor regarded himself unequivocally as a black man. In advance of his first proposed trip to the USA, he wrote in a letter to Andrew Hilyer, the treasurer of the Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Choral Society of Washington DC: 'I am a great believer in my race, and I never lose an opportunity of letting my white friends here know it. 'African-Americans naturally took Coleridge-Taylor to their hearts, representing as he did the embodiment of what black people could achieve if not actively prevented from fulfilling their potential.

Sir Edward Elgar also played a generous part in the development of Coleridge-Taylor’s career. In response to a request that he write an orchestral piece for the Gloucester Three Choirs Festival in 1898, Elgar wrote: ‘I am sorry I am too busy to do it. I wish, wish, wish you would ask Coleridge-Taylor to do it. He still wants recognition, and he is far and away the cleverest fellow going amongst the young men. Please don’t let your committee throw away the chance of doing a good act. ’The outcome was Coleridge-Taylor’s beautiful and dramatic ballad in A minor; After he conducted the first performance on September 12, 1898 he received a standing ovation from both orchestra and audience.

For a shrewd and apposite assessment of the young Coleridge-Taylor, we can turn to Sir Arthur Sullivan, who attended the first performance in November 1898 of Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast—The work which has ensured the immortality of Coleridge-Taylor’s name. According to Coleridge-Taylor's daughter Avril, Sullivan had said: 'I'm always an ill man now, my boy, but I'm coming to hear your music tonight, even if I have to be carried.' Afterwards, he recorded in his diary: 'Much impressed by the lad's genius. He is a composer, not a music-maker. '

The success of Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast was sensational and life-changing: almost overnight it made its composer famous throughout the English-speaking world and it initiated a sequence of commissions from the many annual festivals of choral and orchestral music which were then such a feature of British musical life. Although Coleridge-Taylor had regarded the Wedding Feast as a "one-off", by 1900 he had completed second and third partsThe Death of Minnehaha other Hiawatha’s Departure. Many more choral and orchestral commissions were to be executed in the succeeding years.

Coleridge-Taylor wrote no chamber music after 1896 and, sadly, his final essay in the genre, a string quartet in D minor, is lost. Aside from the choral and orchestral festival commissions and incidental music for the theater, he concentrated his compositional efforts for the most part on music for which he could secure a quick financial return such as duos for violin and piano, solo songs, part-songs and piano suites. Also, after 1899, in order to support his new wife and growing family, he was obliged to devote himself excessively to teaching, conducting and adjudicating. Indeed, overwork undoubtedly contributed to his tragically early death. As he often remarked with a wry smile, had he not sold the rights of Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast to Novello for fifteen guineas he would have been a wealthy man, rather than a somewhat impecunious one.

from notes by Lionel Harrison © 2007

Né à Holborn dans le center de Londres le 15 août 1875, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor avait environ cinq ans lorsque survint le premier grand événement musical de sa vie: il reçut un quart de violon des mains de celui qu'il croyait être son grand- père maternel, le doute venant de ce que la famille avait intentionnellement dissimulé l'identité précise de sa mère, non mariée au Dr Daniel Hughes Taylor — lequel regagna son Sierra Leone natal, probablement avant même la naissance de son fils. Plus tard, la mère du jeune Samuel se maria avec le cheminot George Evans et la famille emménagea à Croydon. Vu les attitudes et les préjugés qui prévalaient en 1880, avoir épousé une fille mère ayant un enfant métis en dit long sur l’homme qu’était George Evans.

Le jeune garçon s’avéra naturellement doué d’une saisissante aptitude au violon. D’abord pris en main par un violoniste local, Joseph Beckwith, puis soutenu par le colonel Herbert Walters, il vit bien vite son talent se développer de manière remarquable. En 1890, Walters parraina son entrée au Royal College of Music, dans la classe de Henry Holmes (violon). Mais ses dispositions ne se limitaient pas au jeu du violon et, son intérêt pour la composition allant croissant, il écrivit In thee, O Lord (1891), un anthem que publia immédiatement Novello. Sur la recommandation de Walters, il étudia sérieusement la composition avec Charles Villiers Stanford; rapidement, il remporta sa première course de composition.

Coleridge-Taylor avait un talent prodigieux et un gût musical raffiné; Stanford le tenait, soulignons-le, pour l’un de ses deux étudiants les plus brillants, l’autre étant William Yeates Hurlstone (ami de Coleridge-Taylor, il mourut à trente ans, en 1906). Pour indéniablement talentueux que fût ce dernier, les dons de Coleridge-Taylor — surtout son flair pour la mélodie — étaient d’un tout autre ordre. Et le jugement de Stanford n’est pas une mince reconnaissance quand on sait qu’il eut notamment pour élèves Arthur Bliss, Frank Bridge, Gustav Holst, Herbert Howells, John Ireland, E.J. Moeran and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Les appréciations portées sur le bulletin scolaire de Coleridge-Taylor à la fin du trimestre pascal de 1895 illustrent de manière touchante toute la considération de Stanford pour his protégé favori: Régularité et ponctualité: «Invariables»; Application: «Infatigable»; Progrès: «Indiscutables»!

À partir de 1896, l'éveil de Coleridge-Taylor à son héritage africain eut un impact croissant sur sa musique: il avait été bouleversé par les spirituals des “Fisk Jubilee Singers” afro-americains, qui venaient juste d'effectuer une tournée en Angleterre. Vers la même époque, il rencontra le poète afro-américain Paul Laurence Dunbar et les mises en musique qu’il réalisa de certains de ses poèmes furent ses toute premières œuvres inspirées par sa race. Nonobstant la dualité de son héritage racial, Coleridge-Taylor se considérait, sans équivoque aucune, comme un homme noir. Avant son premier voyage aux États-Unis, il écrivit à Andrew Hilyer, le trésorier de la Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Choral Society de Washington DC: “Je crois beaucoup en ma race et je ne manque jamais une occasion de le faire savoir à mes amis blancs ici. " Les Afro-Américains portèrent naturellement Coleridge-Taylor dans leur cœur, lui qui incarnait ce à quoi les Noirs pourraient parvenir si on ne les empêchait pas activement de réaliser leur potentiel.

La carrière de Coleridge-Taylor dut also énormément à Sir Edward Elgar qui, répondant à une commande d’œuvre orchestrale pour le Gloucester Three Choirs Festival de 1898, écrivit: “Je suis navré d’être trop occupé pour le faire. Mais j’aimerais tant, tant, tant que vous demandiez à Coleridge-Taylor de le faire. Il est encore en mal de reconnaissance et c’est, de très loin, le plus intelligent de nos jeunes gens. Je vous en prie, ne laissez pas votre comité gâcher cette chance de faire une bonne action. " The 12th of September 1898, après avoir dirigé la première de la splendide et dramatique ballad en la mineur qui en résulta, Coleridge-Taylor fut ovationné et par l’orchestre et par le public.

Pour une évaluation juste et pertante de notre jeune musicien, tournons-nous verse Sir Arthur Sullivan qui, en novembre 1898, assista à la création de Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast—L’œuvre qui allait assurer à Coleridge-Taylor l’immortalité de son nom. Selon la fille de ce dernier, Avril, Sullivan avait dit ce jour-là: "Je suis toujours malade, mon garçon, mais ce soir, je viens entendre ta musique, dût-on me porter." Puis de noter dans son journal: “Fort impressionné par le génie du garçon. C’est un compositeur, pas un faiseur de musique. "

Le succès de Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast fut sensationnel, de ceux qui vous changent une vie: du jour au lendemain, ou presque, Coleridge-Taylor devint célèbre dans tout le monde anglophone et nombre des festivals annuels de musique chorale et orchestrale, qui ponctuaient alors tant la vie musicale britannique, lui commandèrent des œuvres. Bien qu’ayant considéré la Wedding Feast comme un "coup unique", il n’en acheva pas moins, en 1900, les deuxième et troisième parties: The Death of Minnehaha et Hiawatha’s Departure. Maintes autres commandes chorales et orchestral seront honorées dans les années suivantes.

À partir de 1896, Coleridge-Taylor abandonna la musique de chambre et son ultime essai dans ce genre — un quatuor à cordes en ré mineur — est malheureusement perdu. En dehors des pièces orchestrales et chorales commandées par des festivals, en dehors als de musiques de scène pour le théâtre, l'essentiel de ses efforts compositionnels se concentra sur une musique à même de lui assurer un rapide bénéfice financier (tels que les duos pour violon et piano, les chansons solo, les chants polyphoniques et les suites pour piano). En outre, après 1899, la nécessité d’entretenir sa nouvelle épouse et sa famille grandissante l’obligea à consacrer trop de temps à l’enseignement, à la direction d’orchestre et à l’arbitrage. Au vrai, le surmenage contribua sans nul doute à sa mort tragiquement prématurée. Comme il le faisait souvent remarquer avec un sourire désabusé, si seulement il n’avait pas vendu les droits de Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast à Novello pour quinze guinées, il eût été un être riche, pas cet homme un rien impécunieux.

extrait des notes rà © digà © es par Lionel Harrison © 2007
Français: Hypà © rion

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was born on August 15, 1875 in Holborn, London. The first musically significant event in his life took place when he was about five years old and his supposed maternal grandfather gave him a quarter violin. Doubts exist because the exact identity of the child's mother was deliberately concealed because she and his father, Dr. Daniel Hughes Taylor were not married. Dr. Taylor had probably even returned to his native Sierra Leone before the child was born. Little Samuel's mother later married railroad worker George Evans, and the family moved to Croydon. Especially given the attitudes and prejudices of the 1880s, the fact that Evans took under his wing an unmarried mother and a multiracial child speaks for him.

It turned out that the little boy was an amazing natural on the violin. Coleridge-Taylor's talent, initially mentored by local violinist Joseph Beckwith and later assisted by Colonel Herbert Walters, developed rapidly and was remarkable. Walters sponsored his entry into the Royal College of Music as a violin student of Henry Holmes in 1890. However, his skills were not limited to playing the violin, but soon developed an interest in composition, and in 1891 he wrote the Anthem In thee, O Lordwhich was immediately published by Novello. At Walters ’suggestion, Coleridge-Taylor was given the opportunity to begin serious composition studies under Charles Villiers Stanford, and he soon won the first of several composition grants.

Coleridge-Taylor had not only amazing talent but also fine musical taste, and it should be noted that Stanford considered him and his friend William Yeates Hurlstone, who died in 1906 at the age of 30, to be his two most brilliant students. Though Hurlstone was undoubtedly talented, Coleridge-Taylor's talent — especially his melodic flair — was on an entirely different level. Stanford's assessment of Coleridge-Taylor's ability is no small praise when you consider that he has taught Arthur Bliss, Frank Bridge, Gustav Holst, Herbert Howells, John Ireland, E. J. Moeran, and Ralph Vaughan Williams, among others. A rather touching example of Stanford's respect for his favorite student is his contribution to Coleridge-Taylor's college report at the end of the Easter semester of 1895, in which he made the following entries: attendance and punctuality - "always"; Zeal— "tireless"; Progress - "indisputable"!

From 1896 Coleridge-Taylor's awakening to his African heritage had an increasing influence on his music: he was deeply touched by the spirituals of the Afro-American Fisk Jubilee Singers, who had recently toured England. At about the same time he met the Afro-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar and settings of some of Dunbar's poems were the first works to be inspired by his race. Despite the duality of his racial heritage, Coleridge-Taylor unequivocally viewed himself as black. Before his first planned trip to the United States, he wrote in a letter to Andrew Hilyer, Treasurer of the Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Choral Society of Washington, DC: “I have great faith in my breed and never miss an opportunity to meet my white friends here African-Americans, of course, quickly locked Coleridge-Taylor in their hearts, as he embodied for them what blacks could achieve when they were not actively prevented from fulfilling their potential.

Sir Edward Elgar also played a generous role in promoting Coleridge-Taylor's career. When asked to write an orchestral work for the Three Choirs Festival in Gloucester in 1898, he replied, “I am very sorry, but I am too busy. I wish, wish, wish you would ask Coleridge-Taylor to write it. He's still looking for approval and is by far the smartest of the young men. Please don't let your committee waste this chance to do a good deed. ”The result was Coleridge-Taylor's beautifully dramatic ballad in A minor; after he was born on 12.Conducted the premiere on September 18, 1898, he received standing applause from the orchestra and audience.

For an insightful and appropriate assessment of the young Coleridge-Taylor we can turn to Sir Arthur Sullivan, who premiered in November 1898 Hiawatha's wedding visited — the work that granted Coleridge-Taylor immortality. According to Coleridge-Taylor's daughter Avril, Sullivan had said, “I'm always sick now, boy, but I'm coming tonight to listen to your music, even if I have to be carried.” He wrote in his diary afterwards: “Very impressed of the boy's genius. He is a composer, not a music maker. "

The success of Hiawatha's wedding was sensational and changed its life: practically overnight it made its composer famous throughout the English-speaking world and inspired a series of commissions from many of the annual choir and orchestral festivals that characterized British musical life at the time. Although Coleridge-Taylor did the wedding conceived as a single work, he completed the second and third parts by 1900—Death of Minnehaha and Hiawatha's progress. In the years to come he was to perform many orchestral and choir assignments.

After 1896 Coleridge-Taylor stopped writing chamber music, and his last attempt in this genre, a string quartet in D minor, has unfortunately been lost. Apart from the choir and orchestral commissions for festivals and stage music for the theater, he concentrated his compositional diligence largely on music for which he could secure a quick financial profit, such as duos for violin and piano, solo songs, choir songs and piano suites. From 1899 he also had to concentrate a lot on teaching, conducting and judging the jury in order to support his young wife and growing family. If he had the rights for Hiawatha's wedding not sold to Novello for fifteen guineas had he, as he often remarked, been a wealthy man instead of a poor man.

from the accompanying text by Lionel Harrison © 2007
German: Renate Wendel