What is choreoathetoid cerebral palsy

Orthopedic aspects of infantile cerebral palsy

Summary

"Infantile cerebral palsy" is neuromuscular disorders due to non-progressive damage to the maturing brain. The resulting paralysis has different effects on the musculoskeletal system depending on the severity of the disability. In addition, the growth and the static statics have a progressively worsening effect on the functional deficits. For these reasons, early treatment and regular checks are necessary. Conservative procedures include physiotherapy, the use of botulinum toxin A, and orthopedic and plaster techniques. Especially with the milder forms of spastic diparesis, these conservative measures are usually sufficient until the start of school. Subsequently, surgical corrections are often necessary — even earlier in the case of the severely disabled. The necessary operations usually affect several muscles and joints and place high demands on the practitioner in terms of indication and planning. The early functional follow-up treatment with additional installation of treadmill and strength training is an important part of modern rehabilitation. In the age of evidence-based medicine, objective documentation procedures are also beginning to establish themselves in this area.

Abstract

Infantile cerebral palsy constitutes a neuromuscular disorder caused by a nonprogressive damage to the maturing brain. The resultant paralysis in turn affects the locomotor system depending on the severity of the disability. In addition, growth and abnormal loading of joints progressively worsen functional deficits. Thus, early treatment and regular follow-up are necessary. Conservative methods include physiotherapy, administration of botulinum toxin A, and orthopedic and plaster techniques. They usually suffice, particularly in less severe forms of spastic displegia, until school enrollment. Subsequently, surgical correction often proves necessary, in cases of more severe disabilities even earlier. The requisite operations usually treat several muscles and joints simultaneously. The indications for surgery and planning pose a considerable challenge for the attending physician. Early functional aftercare with additional integration of treadmill and strength training is an important component of modern rehabilitation. In this age of evidence-based medicine, objective documentation procedures are also appearing in this field.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Orthopedic University Clinic Heidelberg

    Dr. L. Doederlein

  2. Orthopedic University Clinic, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118, Heidelberg

    Dr. L. Doederlein

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Dr. L. Doederlein.

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Cite this article

Döderlein, L. Orthopedic Aspects of Infantile Cerebral Palsy. Monthly Children's Health151, 815-824 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00112-003-0753-7

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keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Orthopedic management
  • Treatment indication
  • Conservative therapy
  • Operative therapy

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Orthopedic management
  • Treatment indications
  • Surgical and orthotic management